Tag Archives: drinks

ORAL CANCER AND WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

AM I AT RISK FOR ORAL CANCER?

Do a quick self-exam and check out!

Your Self Exam is now complete. Congratulations!

You are at low risk to develop oral cancer. Maintain healthy lifestyle and read more about this condition.

Your Self Exam is now complete. Be careful!

You are at greater risk to develop oral cancer. Reconsider your lifestyle and read more about this condition and how to prevent it.

Have you ever had oral cancer?

Yes No

Do you smoke cigarettes?

Never Former User < 1 pack per day 1 pack or more per day

Do you use chewing or smokeless tobacco?

Never Former User/Rarely Current User

Do you smoke cigars or pipes?

Never Former User/Rarely Current User

How many alcoholic drinks do you typically have in one week?

0 1 – 7 8 – 14 > 14

WHAT IS HAPPENING IN MOUTH DURING A MEAL?

What is happening in the mouth during a meal?

Every time you eat you feed oral bacteria in your mouth. Bacteria begin with the formation of acids, that dissolve tooth enamel. Over time the saliva washes away the acid and remineralises softened tooth areas. If pH of the mouth is below 5.5, the saliva can no longer effectively remineralise teeth, which increases the risk of caries. Read more

WHAT FORMS OF FRUIT ARE GOOD FOR A TEETH?

Is fruit good for your teeth?

It all depends on the type of fruit we eat. Fruit in its composition varies, so it can leave different effects on your teeth. People often prefer fruits than vegetables, because of sugary taste. There are different ways you can eat fruit (fresh, frozen, canned, dried, in the form of juices or jams). Read more

SOUR FOODS AND DRINKS

Are sour foods and drinks harmful to teeth?

If you often crave for this type of food and drinks, it can start the processes of tooth erosion. The tooth enamel begins to decompose under the influence of acids. In the food and beverages you can find a variety of acids. An important factor is the number of times per a day such food is eaten. If food contains acid, you can check in the ingredients table on the back of the packaging. Even fruits and vegetables may contain acid. Teeth are made in a way that they can withstand a variety of oral pH. Teeth  are remineralised with saliva, which protects teeth. Despite consuming acidic food and drink, we can maintain healthy teeth. Like everywhere, even in the diet, there are some limits, which should be taken into consideration, so that we do not start the detriment of our own teeth. There is no need to absolutely avoid acidic food. You should just take into account that it is not consumed to often during a day. Read more

ALCOHOL AND INFLUENCE ON ORAL HEALTH

What are effects of alcohol on oral health?

Alcoholism can also cause problems in the aspect of oral health. It has been proven that people, who are dependent on alcohol, perform oral hygiene that is less frequently and more poorly.
Frequent contact of alcohol with oral mucosa causes increased risk for oral cancer. People who drink a lot of alcohol tend to have gums that bleed more severely. The cause is often in altered function of the liver, since liver normally produce substances that are necessary for the formation of a blood clot. Wounds heal more difficult and slower and are more susceptible to various infections. Read more

SPARKLING MINERAL WATER

Is sparkling mineral water harming your teeth?

Carbonated mineral water contains carbon dioxide and some also variety of flavoring agents and colors. Unlike some other carbonated beverages (Coca Cola, etc.). Sparkling water still has acidic pH due to carbonation, which occurs when adding carbon dioxide into pure water. In some studies has been measured a pH between 3 and 4, which is near the acidity of an orange juice. The addition of gaseous carbon dioxide into the pure water initiates the formation of carbonic acid, which lowers the pH of the drink. Carbon dioxide is the source of bubbles in a sparkling drink. These drinks can have an adverse effect on teeth and can cause erosion of enamel, if it is consumed several times a day. Flavored sparkling water can have even bigger erosive effect on teeth than orange juice, which is considered very erosive. Read more